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Analysing Events

A detailed walkthrough of how to analyse events in WebEngage

Now that you have a robust understanding of events and event attributes, let’s show you how to use the Events section for behavioural analysis.

First Impression

The default view of this section has been designed to show you a top-level view of all the custom events performed by your users over the last 7 days, in descending order.

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  • Each event can be examined in greater detail by selecting their respective bar graphs.
  • On doing so, you will be shown a day-wise breakup of total user activity.
  • The results can further be refined by adding values to the fields of the query bar placed on top.

A Hands-on Analysis

Let's demonstrate a use-case to help you get acquainted with the workings of this section.

Use-case

Let's say that you run an international e-commerce business and want to analyse the top locations contributing to purchases over the previous week. For this, we'll analyse the event Checkout Completed - which represents purchase in the user's lifecycle.

All we need to do is;

  • Select the event, Checkout Completed
  • Select Country as the first dimension in the field Over
  • Hit enter!
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As you can see Checkout Completed has been performed by a majority of users based in Indonesia.

Now, let’s dig deeper to find out which city of Indonesia has contributed to maximum purchases.

For this, we’ll select the bar graph of Indonesia.

  • Doing so will automatically change the value in the field Over, from Country to City, adding Country = Indonesia as an attribute filter to the event, Checkout Completed.
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Now, that we have insights into the top cities, let’s find out the popular operating systems which have been used to purchase the products. All we need to do is add OS Name to the field Split By and hit enter!

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There you have it - all purchases made over the last 7 days, from the various cities of the top country, Indonesia, split by OS of the devices used to make the purchase.

Results

A majority of active users were located in Surabaya, Indonesia and prefered using iOS devices over the previous week.

Similarly, you can slice-and-dice all kinds of behavioural data to gain specific, actionable insights.

Understanding features of the event analysis section

Now that you've got the hang of how this section works, let’s deep dive into its features to help you gain maximum insights:

Step 1: Select the Date Range

Using the date range filter placed on the top right, you can specify a period for which you want to analyse user behaviour. The default period has been set to, Last 7 days.

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Step 2: Select Show (Occurrences or Uniques)

As discussed under, How are Events Calculated for Analysis?, there are two ways in which we calculate the number of times users perform an event; occurrences and uniques.

As shown in the visual below, either option can be selected from the drop-down nested under the field, Show, depending on your analytical needs.

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To understand the impact of selecting either option, better, let's demonstrated a small use-case.

Use-case: Analysing Occurrences / Uniques

Let’s assume that you run an e-commerce website and would like to find out the average number of times a user viewed product pages over the previous week.

For this, we'll do a quick, occurrences / uniques calculation for the event, Product Page Viewed, for Last 7 days.

Here we can see that occurrences for Product Page Viewed equals 29,440 times for Last 7 days.

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But when viewing uniques, we see that Product Page Viewed was performed by 2,464 users over the same period.

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Results

Hence, now we know that on an average, a user viewed 12 product pages over the previous week.

Step 3: Select the Event

Next, define the event you'd like to examine by choosing an event or a set of events from the dropdown nested under the field, Of.

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The drop-down includes all the system events, campaign events and custom events tracked for your account. All the system event and campaign events pre-defined by us are listed here for reference.

Step 3.1.: Apply Attribute Filters to the Event

You can further narrow down the scope of the event by adding attribute filters to it. This can be done through the filter icon placed next to the field, Of.

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On clicking the icon, you will be prompted with a modal, allowing you to apply several attribute filters. Each field comes with a drop-down, including only those attributes which can be applied to the selected event.

The following event attributes are included in the dropdown options:

  • Time (Event Time)

  • Location (City, Country)

  • Technology (OS, Device, Browser Name, App Version)

  • Marketing (Channel, Campaign Source, Campaign Medium, Campaign Name)

  • Screen (Page URL, Screen Name)

  • Custom Attributes (Only when a custom event is selected)

  • Miscellaneous/ Other (Session Count, API Version, Language)

Now, let's walk you through this in detail.

Use-case 1: Applying One Attribute Filter

Let’s say that you want to analyse the event, Cart Viewed only for a set of users whose cart value exceeds $1,000. For this, we'll simply apply Cart Value as a filter.

Here's how you can go about it:

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Step 1: Select the event, Cart - Viewed

Step 2: Click the filter icon

Step 3: Apply the attribute, Cart Value as a filter using the drop-down on the screen

Step 4: Further define the scope of the event by limiting the Cart Value as greater than 1000

Step 5: Click Apply to view results!

Use-case 2: Applying Multiple Attribute Filters

Let’s take the example of a custom event; Product Viewed, and add the following attributes to it for our analysis;

  • Product Name: Puma running pants

  • Page URL: /www.companyname.com/women/pants

  • Country: US

  • OS: iOS

Now let’s show you how to apply these attribute filters to the event, using the AND-OR logic.

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Method 1: Using the AND logic to club attributes filters

If we use the AND logic to apply all the attribute filters listed above, then your analysis will be limited to a set of users who have only viewed Puma Running Pants, AND on the page, www.companyname.com//women/pants AND are from the US AND use an iOS device.

Implications: So, using the AND logic to club event attributes you can narrow down the scope of analysis to a particular set of users whose actions fall in line with a sum of all the attributes.

Method 2: Using the OR logic to club attributes filters

If we use the OR logic to club and apply all the attribute filters listed above, then your analysis would include a broader set of users who have either viewed Puma Running Pants OR have visited the page www.companyname.com/women/pants OR have viewed any Product Page from the US OR have performed the event on an iOS device.

Implications: So, using the OR logic to club event attributes you can broaden the scope of analysis by including users whose actions fall in line with any one of the attribute filters.

Hence, when using the OR logic, we suggest that you broaden the user base by clubbing related parameters together. For example, including the last two attributes; Location and OS, doesn't help us gain any valuable insights as these parameters are unrelated to Product Name and Page URL.

Lastly, you can always hit the Reset Button to remove all the attributes and start again.

Note: It's not possible to add attribute filters when analysing All System Events or All Custom Events as the attributes which can be applied to each event, vary.

Step 4: Select the Dimension(s) for Analysis

The next step is to define the dimension(s) against which you'd like to analyse the event. The query bar has been designed to facilitate in-depth behavioural analysis by combining an exhaustive list of pre-defined parameters.

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Using the dropdowns nested under the fields, Over and Split By, you can combine up to two parameters to slice-and-dice your data.

Dropdown options in both fields include the following event attributes:

  • Time (Days, Weeks, Months)

  • Time Block (Hours of Days, Days of Week, Months of Year)

  • Location (City, Country)

  • Technology (OS, Device, Browser Name, App Version)

  • UTM Parameters

  • Screen (Page URL, Screen Name)

  • Engagement ID (ID of Campaign/ Journey)

  • Custom Attributes (Only when a custom event is selected)

In case you'd like to analyse an event against one dimension, leave the field, Split By blank, and hit enter.

Note: When analysing All System Events or All Custom Events, the field, Over gets deactivated automatically. This restriction has been put in place to avoid a chaotic display of insights.

Step 5: Select the Format of Visualisation

Lastly, while Bar Graph has been set as the default format of visualisation, you can change this to a Line Graph or a Table, using the overflow menu placed on the top-right.

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We hope this has given you a good idea of how you can make the most of the Events section of your dashboard to gain relevant behavioural insights.

Please feel free to reach out via support(AT)webengage.com in case you have any further queries. We’re always happy to help!